Why Being Transgender is Not a Choice

Haylen Rose
5 min readNov 17, 2023

In discussions surrounding gender diversity, a common misconception persists — the idea that being transgender is a choice. It’s crucial to dispel this misunderstanding and recognize that one’s gender identity is a deeply ingrained aspect of who they are.

Understanding why being transgender is not a choice is essential for fostering empathy, respect, and creating a more inclusive society.

“one’s gender identity is a deeply ingrained aspect of who they are.”

Inherent Nature of Gender Identity:

Gender identity, the deeply-felt sense of being male, female, or another gender, is a fundamental aspect of human identity. For transgender individuals, their gender identity doesn’t align with the sex assigned to them at birth. This misalignment is not a conscious decision but rather an innate aspect of their identity.

Scientific Evidence:

Numerous scientific studies support the understanding that being transgender is not a choice. Research indicates that biological, genetic, and hormonal factors contribute to the development of gender identity. These findings highlight the complexity of gender and the biological underpinnings that influence how individuals perceive themselves.

Not an exhaustive list, but here are some of these medical studies:

1. National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Report — The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People

2. American Psychiatric Association (APA) Position Statements — The APA recognizes that gender identity is a deeply-felt sense of being male, female, or something else.

3. Gene variants provide insight into brain, body incongruence in transgender

4. Study on brain structure before Hormone Replacement Therapy — Brain Sex in Transgender Women Is Shifted towards Gender Identity

5. Scientific American — Is There Something Unique about the Transgender Brain? Imaging studies and other research suggest that there is a biological basis for transgender identity

6. Genetic Research into the complexity of gene Variants past the myth of XY and XX

“Research indicates that biological, genetic, and hormonal factors contribute to the development of gender identity.”

Consistency Across Cultures and Ages:

The experience of being transgender is not confined to a specific culture, time, or geographical location. Transgender individuals exist across diverse societies and throughout history, reinforcing the idea that being transgender is not a cultural trend or a contemporary phenomenon but a consistent aspect of human variation.

Transgender individuals have existed across various cultures throughout history. Examples include:

1. Hijra in Hinduism: The Hijra community in South Asia has a long history and is recognized as a third gender in countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Hijra, also known as Aravani, have a historical presence in Hindu culture often being regarded as magical and servants to royalty.

2. Two-Spirit in Native American Cultures: Many Native American cultures historically recognized Two-Spirit people, individuals who embodied both masculine and feminine qualities.

3. Fa’afafine in Samoa: In Samoan culture, the Fa’afafine are individuals who identify and live as a gender different from their assigned sex at birth.

4. Kathoey in Thailand: Kathoey, often translated as “ladyboys,” are transgender women in Thailand who have been a visible part of Thai culture for centuries.

5. Berdache in Native American Plains Cultures: The term “berdache” was historically used to describe individuals in some Native American Plains cultures who took on a gender role different from their assigned sex.

These examples illustrate the diversity of cultural attitudes towards gender identity throughout history. It’s important to approach these topics with respect for the specific cultural contexts involved.

“transgender individuals exist across diverse societies and throughout history, reinforcing the idea that being transgender is not a cultural trend or a contemporary phenomenon but a consistent aspect of human variation.”

Mental Health Implications:

The notion that being transgender is a choice often contributes to harmful stigmas and discrimination. Research shows that societal pressure and lack of acceptance can have negative mental health impacts on transgender individuals.

Acknowledging that being transgender is not a choice is crucial for reducing stigma, increasing empathy, inclusion and promoting mental well-being.

It should be noted that while societal pressures, the effects of gender dysphoria and personal situation can contribute to mental health issues, Transgenderism itself is NOT mental health disorder despite the popular misconception.

Personal Authenticity:

Transgender individuals often embark on a journey of self-discovery and authenticity, seeking to align their external selves with their internal sense of identity. This journey reflects a genuine effort to live authentically, free from the constraints of societal expectations, rather than a choice made lightly or capriciously.

Acknowledging that being transgender is not a choice is crucial for reducing stigma and promoting mental well-being.”

Diversity of Gender Experiences:

The diverse experiences of transgender individuals highlight that gender identity is a complex and varied aspect of human existence. Each person’s journey is unique, emphasizing the individuality and authenticity of their gender identity. Recognizing this diversity is essential for fostering understanding and acceptance.

Legal and Medical Perspectives:

Many countries and medical organizations recognize the legitimacy of transgender identities, affirming that being transgender is not a choice but a valid aspect of human diversity. Legal protections and medical support for transgender individuals underscore the importance of acknowledging and respecting their gender identity.

Conclusion:

Understanding that being transgender is not a choice is a critical step towards creating a more inclusive and compassionate society.

By recognizing the biological, consistent, and inherent nature of gender identity, we can foster empathy, reduce stigma, and create environments where individuals can embrace their authentic selves without fear of judgment or discrimination.

Embracing this understanding is fundamental to promoting respect, dignity, and equality for all, regardless of their gender identity.

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Haylen Rose

Technologist, Entrepreneur, Agile advocate, Software Engineer, proud female activist who happens to be transgender